Life Line Screening Reviews: Are their Preventive Health Screenings worth it?






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Did you know that, according to the American Heart Association, around 80% of stroke and cardiovascular disease can be prevented? Even if you’re not showing any symptoms, preventive screenings can detect your risk factor before things go downhill. And since 4 out of 5 stroke victims’ first symptom is the stroke itself (source: American Academy of Neurology), screenings should be top-of-mind. 

And yet, preventive health screenings occupy a curious place in the people’s mind. On the one hand, we know how important it is to keep ahead of any health issues. But on the other hand, actually going out and doing them can be a bit of a pain.

For many people, traveling to a hospital and speaking to doctors when they don’t have pressing medical issues is inconvenient. But what if someone simplified the whole process from start to finish?

Enter: Life Line Screening. They promise to provide non-invasive screenings that can help identify risk factors for a wide range of illnesses. Let’s take a look at how they stack up in the overall market. We’re also able to offer some exclusive discounts for our readers. 

Table of Contents

Who is Life Line Screening?

Life Line Screening is a well-established nationwide company that has been making people aware of unrecognized health problems since 1993. They screen about 1 million people per year and are dedicated to providing high-quality screenings at affordable rates.

To achieve this, Life Line Screening hosts over 14,000 screening events per year in community buildings like town halls, libraries, and churches. From these locations, they offer patients dozens of different screenings that can be grouped into the following four categories.

  • Cardiovascular Disease & Stroke Risk
  • Liver, Kidney, & Diabetes
  • Cancer
  • Bone & Joint

The process is remarkably streamlined and smooth and seeks to eliminate the discomfort and inconvenience associated with trips to the hospital or health clinics.

So, how does it work?

Person getting a blood pressure test during a health screening
Source: Mufid Majnun

Life Line Screening Preventive Health Process

1 – First, you book an appointment on their website. From there, you’ll receive detailed instructions about where and when to check in for your screening. Additionally, Life Line Screening will provide details of how you can prepare for your appointment.

2 – Upon arrival, you are welcomed at registration, where you fill out a quick health questionnaire. The more organized among us can fill these forms out before arrival. Once that information is completed, a Life Line Screening tech will bring you to a private screening area to perform your tests.

3 – Each screening is conducted in just a few minutes. Best of all is that you can stay clothed and relaxed the whole time.

4 – Some of your test results may be available at the screening. While the rest of your results — which may require a board-certified physician’s review — are mailed to your home within around 14 days. These results will include more detailed findings that your can share with your personal physician.

Oh, and by the way, trained technicians do the screening process itself. Life Line Screening uses state-of-the-art technology to perform quick, easy, and pain-free medical screenings using three different methods.

Credit: Owen Beard

Life Line Screening Testing Methods

Ultrasound

Many people will be aware of how ultrasounds are used during pregnancy. But of course, it works well for a wide range of health checks. Patients lie down as a technician uses a transducer (it’s like a wand) with some gel. From here, sound waves are sent out and bounce back to form an image.

An ultrasound is an excellent option because it’s not an x-ray, it’s pain-free, and it doesn’t require you to remove any clothes.

Finger-stick Blood Test

Finger-stick blood tests are performed with a lancet that contains a small needle. They poke a small hole in the finger to draw the blood needed for the study. While lancets do have a needle, it’s just a small prick and far less painful or scary than larger needles.

Limited EKG

EKGs (electrocardiograms) are painless tests that measure the heart’s electrical activity. Life Line Screening uses an EKG designed to identify atrial fibrillation. Electrodes, which are small patches, are placed on the skin so that a computer can graph the rhythm of your heart.

It’s a straightforward process that beats the invasive alternative of hanging around a crowded hospital.

Now that we’ve looked at Life Line Screenings testing methods, we’ll take a more detailed look at the various screenings they provide below.

What screenings does Life Line Screenings offer, specifically?

Model depicting the anatomy of a heart
Source: Robina Weermeijer

Cardiovascular Disease & Stroke Risk screenings

Carotid Artery Disease

Carotid artery disease happens if plaque builds up in the artery that runs from the neck and to the brain. If left unchecked, it can lead to sudden difficulty talking, garbled speech, or even a deadly or debilitating stroke. Not trying to scare anyone, but the point is that it’s important. 

Screening method: Ultrasound

Warning signs include:

  • Numbness or weakness on one side of the body
  • Dizziness
  • Sudden difficulty talking
  • Sudden vision problems

Who is this test for?: Carotid artery disease screenings are recommended for anyone who is 50+ or for anyone 40+ at risk of cardiovascular disease (risk factors include family history of stroke or cardiovascular disease, smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol, obesity).

Cost: [see latest price based on your location]

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when the aorta stretches and expands into the belly. This serious medical emergency can cause bleeding into the abdomen.

Screening method: Ultrasound

Warning signs include:

  • Severe abdominal or back pain
  • Shock
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting

Who is this test for?: AAA screenings are recommended for anyone who is 50+ or for anyone 40+ at risk of cardiovascular disease (risk factors include family history of stroke or cardiovascular disease, smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol, obesity).

Cost: [see latest price based on your location]

Atrial Fibrillation (Afib)

Atrial fibrillation (Afib), known as arrhythmia, occurs when the upper chambers of the heartbeat irregularly. This condition may lead to blood clots, which can travel to the brain, causing a stroke.

Screening Method: Limited EKG designed to identify Atrial Fibrillation

Warning signs include: 

  • Chest pain
  • Heart palpitations
  • Shortness of breath, even at rest

Who is this test for?:

Adults aged 50+, or anyone 40+ with any of these risk factors: obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, Coronary artery disease, smoking, overactive thyroid, heavy alcohol or caffeine consumption, sleep apnea.

Cost: [see latest price based on your location]

Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) is a hardening of the arteries of the leg. It can lead to pain in the feet or legs and even gangrene. 

Screening method: Blood pressure cuffs are secured around the ankles and arms. From there, an ultrasound measures the systolic blood pressure of the limbs.

Warning signs include:

  • Leg pains
  • Smooth and shiny skin on the feet and legs
  • Constant leg pain
  • Loss of sensation in the legs.

Who is this test for?:

Adults aged 50+, plus adults aged 40+ with a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (risk factors include family history of stroke or cardiovascular disease, smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol, obesity).

Cost: [see latest price based on your location]

Healthy foods by Ella Olsson
Source: Ella Olsson

Complete Lipid Panel/Cholesterol Test

Cholesterol is a substance that can cause plaque buildup in the arteries. This can lead to blood clots, a stroke, or heart attacks. By measuring cholesterol levels, patients can determine their risk of developing atherosclerosis.

Screening method: Finger-stick blood sample

Warning signs:

  • High cholesterol has no warning signs and can only be detected by doing a test.

Who is this test for?:

Adults over 50, plus adults over 20 who have a risk factor (risk factors include family history of stroke or cardiovascular disease, smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol, obesity).

Cost: $60

6 For Life Health Screening Assessment

6 For Life Health Screening Assessment tests for stroke, diabetes, heart disease, lung cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Testing method: Finger-stick blood sample and blood pressure.

Warning signs include:

  • It varies depending on the condition

Who is this test for?:

It is recommended for anyone who is age 50+ or for anyone 40+ with a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (risk factors include family history of stroke or cardiovascular disease, smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol, obesity).

Cost: $79

C-Reactive Protein Test

A C-reactive protein test screens for inflammation. The body releases C-reactive protein if arteries are clogged with plaque.

Testing method: Finger-stick blood test

Warning signs: 

None

Who is this test for?:

It is recommended for anyone who is age 50+ or for anyone 40+ with a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (risk factors include family history of stroke or cardiovascular disease, smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol, obesity).

Cost: $60

happy father and child by Mieke Campbell
Source: Mieke Campbell

Annual Key Health Men and Women Preventive Health Screening

This test is used to assess risk for six chronic conditions: type 2 diabetes, heart disease, heart failure, stroke, lung cancer and COPD. Additionally, it scans for c-reactive protein, glucose blood levels, and high cholesterol.

Screening Method: Finger-stick blood sample, plus other metrics like BMI and blood pressure. The test requires 12 hours of fasting beforehand.

Warning signs include: It varies depending on the condition

Who is this test for?

Adults 50+ who want to take a detailed look at their vascular health.

Cost: $99

Men’s Wellness Panel

This comprehensive wellness panel tests for prostate cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Understanding these biomarkers give a good picture of overall health.

Screening method: Finger-stick blood sample

Warning signs: It varies depending on the condition. 

Who is this test for?: Men over 40+ looking to take a more proactive approach to their wellness.

Cost: $139

*Optionally, a Men’s Premium Panel Plus test is available for $199. In addition to screening for the conditions in the regular Men’s Wellness Panel, it also tests for kidney function, blood sugar levels, and thyroid function.

Source: Hillary Ungson

Women's Wellness Panel

The women’s wellness panel is a comprehensive test for thyroid function, blood sugar levels, and c-reactive protein. Understanding these biomarkers give a good picture of overall health.

Screening method: Finger-stick blood sample

Warning signs include: It varies depending on the condition. 

Who is this test for?: Women over 40+ who want to take a more proactive approach to their wellness.

Cost: $139

*Optionally, a Women’s Wellness Panel Plus is also available for $149. This includes a test for kidney function.

Liver, Kidney, & Diabetes preventive screenings

Kidney Function Test

Undiagnosed kidney disease causes toxins and waste to accumulate in the body, leading to issues like stroke, heart disease, decreased immune response, and death.

Screening method: Finger-stick blood sample

Warning signs include:

  • Vomiting or nausea
  • Poor concentration
  • Sleeplessness
  • Fatigue
  • High blood pressure
  • Frequent urination

Who is this test for?

Adults aged 60+, and adults aged 50+ with a risk factor of diabetes, high blood pressure or family history of kidney disease.

Cost: $60

healthy greens spread out on a table
Source: Dose Juice

Type 2 Diabetes Test and Diagnosis

Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases where the body doesn’t produce enough insulin. Because insulin is used to convert blood glucose to energy, type 1 and type 2 diabetes causes an excess of glucose in the bloodstream, damaging health.

Screening method: Finger-stick blood glucose screening

Warning signs include:

  • Frequent urination
  • Extreme hunger
  • Extreme weight loss
  • Unusual thirst
  • Fatigue
  • Slowly healing cuts or bruises
  • Recurring skin, gum, or bladder infections

Who is this test for?

Adults 45+ or younger adults with risk factors for diabetes (risk factors include family history of diabetes, high blood pressure, physical inactivity, BMI of 25 or over).

Cost: $60

Liver Function Screening

Damage to the liver can lead to liver failure, which is life-threatening.

Screening method: Finger-stick blood test 

Warning signs include:

  • Skin or eyes that appear yellowish
  • Swelling in the legs and ankles
  • Stomach pain
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Dark urine

Who is this test for?

Adults aged 45+

Cost: $60

A1c Screening

The American Diabetes Association recommends the A1c test to diagnose prediabetes, type 1 diabetes, and type 2 diabetes. This test screens average blood sugar levels for the past 2-3 months.

Screening method: Finger-stick blood test

Warning signs include:

  • Frequent urination
  • Extreme hunger
  • Extreme weight loss
  • Unusual thirst
  • Fatigue
  • Slowly healing cuts or bruises
  • Recurring skin, gum, or bladder infections

Who is this test for?

Adults at risk of diabetes

Cost: $60

Kidney Function, Liver Function, and C-Reactive Protein Screening

As covered above, kidney and liver damage have significant health implications. Because many of these conditions can develop without symptoms, early screening is vital.

Screening method: Finger-stick blood sample

Warning signs include: It varies depending on the condition. 

Who is this test for?

Adults over 40, plus adults 20+ with diabetes or prediabetes, high blood pressure, or a family history of liver or kidney disease. Additionally, adults with cardiovascular disease risk factors such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, obesity (body mass index 25 or higher), smoking (past or present), or a family history of stroke or heart disease.

Cost: $139

Father and daughter playing in the pool
Source: National Cancer Institute

Cancer screenings

Prostate Cancer (PSA) Test

Prostate cancer is statistically the second most common type of cancer. While mortality rates from prostate cancer have dropped in recent times, the disease is mainly symptomless, making early screening crucial.

Screening method: finger-stick blood sample

Warning signs include:

  • blood in urine
  • impotence
  • difficulty with urination
  • bone pain in ribs, hips, and spine
  • Muscle weakness and nerve pain

Who is this test for?

Men aged between 40-69, especially those with a family history of prostate cancer

Cost: $60

Colorectal Cancer Screening Test

Colorectal Cancer can develop from precancerous polyps found in the colon or rectum. While these kits do not detect cancer, they can screen for indications of colorectal cancer, like blood in the stool.

Screening method: take-home kit

Warning signs include:

  • Blood in the stool
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Frequent stomach pain or aches

Who is this test for?

Adults aged 45+, or those with a family history of colorectal cancer

Cost: $65

dog playing with a bone
Source: Chewy

Bone & Joint screenings

Osteoporosis (Bone Density) Screening

Osteoporosis is a condition that can affect bone density. When new bone is replaced too slowly, bones can become too brittle. This condition leads to millions of broken bones each year.

Screening method: Ultrasound

Warning signs include:

  • Bone fractures when aged 50+
  • Back pain
  • Loss of height
  • Changes in posture, like becoming more hunched over

Who is this test for?

Adults aged 50+, or those with osteoporosis risk factors, such as smoking, inactivity, excessive alcohol consumption, low calcium or vitamin d.

Cost: [see latest price based on your location]

Vitamin D Deficiency Testing

Vitamin D is vital for muscle function, bone health, and fighting infection. It’s also crucial in helping nutrient and vitamin absorption in the body. Vitamin D deficiency has been heavily linked to cognitive impairment, increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease, and cancer.

Screening method: Finger-stick blood sample

Warning signs include: 

  • Fatigue
  • Bone or back pain
  • Hair loss
  • Depression
  • Bone pain

Who is This Test For:

Adults over 21, especially those with risk factors like obesity, low exposure to sunlight, vegans, and darker skin.

Cost: $60

Bone Health Test (for both men and women)

Osteoporosis occurs when the body loses too much bone. Literally translated as “porous bone,” this condition can be severe and lead to easily fractured bones.

The condition is difficult to detect until a bone is broken, but screening for Vitamin D levels in the blood, bone density, and thyroid function can help with early detection.

Screening method: Finger-stick blood sample & ultrasound

Warning signs include:

  • None

Who is This Test For:

Women near on in menopause and adults who have broken a bone after the age of 50.

Cost: $99

Life Line Screening Pros and Cons: Is it worth getting a preventive health screening?

One big argument that sometimes steers people away from getting a preventive health screening is that the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force’s guidelines actually often recommend people not get one done, if they’re asymptomatic. Why? Because often these screenings identify a cardiovascular problem for patients, which can cause intense anxiety and fear, even if it ends up being a false positive. Dr. Steven Gubin, a board-certified cardiologist of the Stern Cardiovascular Center, says this, though

"You're actually screening people who don't have symptoms so you can prevent a cardiovascular event," he said. "You can actually identify patients that have very early signs of atherosclerosis (plaque build-up). If you pick up plaque at an early age, you'd be more aggressive in treating the risk factors to help prevent a cardiovascular event. These screenings save lives, definitely."

Dr. Steven Gubin, Stern Cardiovascular Center

The fact is, there are good points on both sides of the argument around the validity of preventive health screenings. But ask yourself this: if the “worst” risk is that evidence of cardiovascular disease risk is identified, if even a false-positive, is that so horrible? I imagine that if I were ever in this situation, the initial anxiety and fear that I felt would quickly turn into a personal mission to improve my diet, lifestyle habits, and fitness regimen to stop any cardiovascular problems in their tracks. It is recommended to review all results with your personal physician to take action. 

With that being said, let’s take a look at the arguments for and against using Life Line Screening for your next preventive health screening.

Pros of Life Line Screening

  • Affordable prices. If someone were to get their carotid artery checked, it may cost over $1,000, even with insurance. With Life Line Screening, it’s only $149 for a package of 5 screenings to identify risks of cardiovascular disease and stroke. 
  • Generous pricing packages. For $149, you can get screenings done for all five of the following*: 
  • Life Line Screening is a CLIA-certified lab, meaning their lab processes meet or exceed the guidelines set by the federal government.
  • Effective at screening for health problems, even if you’re asymptomatic. 
  • Life Line Screening has screened over 10 million people since 1993. 
  • Over 14,000 locations in the US
  • Great online reviews from their customers (incl. A+ rating on the BBB)

*To take advantage of this package deal, you’ll just have to use any link in this article.

Cons of Life Line Screening

  • Insurance usually does not cover preventive screenings.
  • Screenings are designed to identify problems; not measure the severity of a specific condition. If the test results of a screening do uncover an issue, you’ll then need to consult with a physician about getting more quantitative testing done.
Nurse with a patient
Source: Zach Vessels

Life Line Screening Reviews: What are others on the internet saying?

Online reviews for Life Line Screening are generally positive. Some negative reviews are a result of a misunderstanding of the service. For example, some reviewers believe the scope of the service should include health treatments; however, Life Line Screening’s service is explicitly about identifying conditions so that patients can seek medical treatment.

Remember that these testimonials reflect real life stories from Life Line Screening customers. If you see testimonials that include abnormal findings, like false positives or negatives, this doesn’t necessarily reflect the typical experience. Most screening results are normal.

Life Line Screening review Reviewsio 1
This one is a bit of an outlier. They're happy with Life Line, but seem to be having health issues that may require further insights from doctors.

The Bottom Line: Is Life Line Screening a good option for getting preventive health screenings?

As the old saying goes, prevention is better than cure. As people reach their 40s and 50s and beyond, they become more susceptible to health complications. Traditional methods like visiting a clinic or hospital can be time-consuming and expensive. Additionally, many people find hospital screening to be invasive, uncomfortable, and even painful.

Life Line Screening offers a credible alternative through affordable and straightforward screening options for a wide variety of conditions. Some of their tests can be taken individually for between $60- $139. However, 5 screenings to identify risks of cardiovascular disease and stroke can be booked in a package for only $149. This package represents great value for money and all 5 screenings are performed in 1 appointment.

The program employs doctors and technicians and uses cutting-edge technology to provide peace of mind or early detection. Additionally, the service maintains strict quality checks to ensure tests are accurate.

Getting out in front of medical complications is an excellent way to avoid severe health problems in the future. By providing people with a hassle-free way to proactively screen for illness, Life Line Screening’s service is extremely valuable and well worth the money. After all, as anyone who suffers from an illness will tell you, health is our greatest wealth.